We take care of you! Imaging for Women

(816) 453 - 2700

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(816) 453 - 9943

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Imaging for Women

630 NW Englewood Road, Kansas City, MO 64118

(816) 453 - 2700

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What to expect:


When you arrive at Imaging for Women, you will fill out the necessary paperwork (you may go to our patient portal - click here to fill this information out prior to your visit). You will be escorted to a private dressing room where you will be given a special cape to wear during your exam. One of our registered mammographers will take you into the mammography suite for your mammogram. Although we need to compress your breast to obtain an adequate exam, you always have control over when to stop the compression. After taking your images and reviewing them on her computer workstation, the technologist will escort you back to your dressing room and will send your digital images to the radiologist for the reading of your exam. We will discuss your results with you after reviewing all of the information and your exam. You will be given a layman’s report for your records and we will fax a formal report to your physician, usually within 2 hours of your exam.


CAD (computer-aided diagnosis) is a technology to aid in finding early cancers and to help us decrease the chance of missing a subtle cancer on your exam. CAD is one more way that we take care of you.

Mammograms Ultra Sounds Bone Density

Preparation:  


Please remove all powder, lotion and/or deodorant prior to your exam. Wear comfortable clothing and be prepared to change into one of our comfortable capes. Previous exams at another facility? If you have had previous mammograms performed at another facility, we will be happy to obtain those images for you by having you sign a simple release form.

Screening


3D Mammography


Breast Biopsies


1.) What is the difference between a 3D mammogram compared to a regular 2D mammogram?

2.) Will I still have to have my breasts compressed?

3.) What is the advantage of 3D mammography?

4.) Are there any disadvantages to 3D mammography?

5.) Will I get more radiation from a 3D mammogram?

6.) What will happen following my mammogram?

1.)  What is the difference between a 3D mammogram compared to a regular 2D mammogram?

Your experience should be very similar to previous mammograms at our office. The only difference you experience is that obtaining 3D imaging will take a few seconds longer than the routine imaging.

2.)  Will I still have to have my breasts compressed?

Yes, you still need compression. Why? Compression reduces the amount of radiation we need to examine your breasts. Compression also helps to separate any overlapping tissues so that cancer detection is improved.

3.) What is the advantage of 3D mammography?

4.) Are there any disadvantages to 3D mammography?

The equipment is certainly of the highest technology and this increases cost. Another cost is the storage of data for this exam. Each exam requires about 1 gigabyte of data. That’s a lot of data to store!  

5.) Will I get more radiation from a 3D mammogram?

Not with our GE low dose 3D system. The small amount of radiation you obtain from this exam is no different than what you received last year from us at your routine 2D exam. This may not be true for other 3D systems, which use higher amounts of radiation during their exams.

6.) What will happen following my mammogram?

After your mammogram images are obtained, they will be reviewed by our radiologist. If any additional imaging needs to be done, we will always give you the option of having it done while you are at our facility. You will be given a layman’s report at the conclusion of your exam.

Ultrasounds Bone Density Mammogram Mammography

Diagnostic Exams


If you have a new problem with your breasts (a lump, pain, thickening or skin changes), your doctor needs to send us an order before we can perform the exam.

Mammograms

Breast Biopsy FAQ

Being told you need a breast biopsy can be unsettling, and we understand that you will have questions. Below are some answers to commonly asked questions.

1.) What are my options if I’m told I need a biopsy?

If you wish to have the biopsy performed here, we offer both Ultrasound and Stereotactic biopsies. Both types of biopsies use imaging to guide the radiologist to the correct area for sampling. An alternative to a needle biopsy is a surgical excision, which is performed in an operating room at a hospital. A surgical excision is often not necessary if the lesion that is biopsied turns out to be benign.

2.) What is the difference between an Ultrasound guided biopsy compared to a Stereotactic biopsy?

The difference really comes down to which type of imaging is used to find the area that needs to be biopsied.

Ultrasound guided biopsies are done in “real time”, meaning that the radiologist is able to watch the area being biopsied on a monitor as it is happening. This allows the radiologist to biopsy the correct site while avoiding other structures.

3.) What is the difference between an Ultrasound guided biopsy compared to a Stereotactic biopsy?

The difference really comes down to which type of imaging is used to find the area that needs to be biopsied.

Ultrasound guided biopsies are done in “real time”, meaning that the radiologist is able to watch the area being biopsied on a monitor as it is happening. This allows the radiologist to biopsy the correct site while avoiding other structures.

Stereotactic biopsy is done using a pair of mammogram images to target an area of abnormality, which is often calcifications. Special care is taken by the radiologist to select the most appropriate path and images are taken throughout the procedure to ensure the correct area is being biopsied.

4.) What are the risks / potential complications of having a biopsy?

The three most common complications are infection, bleeding, and non-diagnosis due to inadequate sampling.

Infection: The risk for infection is less than 1%. If an infection does occur, it may require you to take antibiotics. This would be managed by your primary / referring physician.

Bleeding: We assume that some bleeding is going on in the breast during and after the biopsy. The amount of bleeding is variable from case to case and this will be discussed with you prior to the biopsy. Sometimes, a collection of blood called a hematoma can develop. If it does, it may take weeks or more to go away and can be quite tender. It is extremely rare that a bleeding complication arises that would require a surgical intervention, but cases of it have been reported so we feel it is important to let you know this.

Non-diagnosis: This simply means that we do not have enough information to come to a conclusion. This can happen if the pathologist (the physician who analyzes the biopsy) does not get enough tissue to analyze. This can also occur if the report from the pathologist does not match or account for the findings on the mammogram / ultrasound. If this occurs, it may be necessary to re-biopsy the area.

5.) Will the biopsy hurt?

For most people, the actual biopsy does not hurt. The skin and tissue around the area to be biopsied are numbed using lidocaine (similar to the numbing medicine used by a dentist). The numbing of the skin and tissues can be minimally uncomfortable for some. Despite our best efforts, some patients do have pain with the biopsy, so it is a possibility. We do our best to minimize a patient’s pain.

5.) How long does it take to get the results?


We schedule for a follow up appointment to go over the results in approximately 1 week. If the results come back sooner, we will call and see if you can come in earlier.

6.) Why should I have the biopsy done here versus a hospital?


The procedure itself is the same no matter where you have it done. At Imaging for Women, we charge on average about 75% less than a hospital to do the biopsy. There is not a separate bill from the radiologist. We do not charge a facility fee.